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NATIONAL LEAGUE 2 EASTView League Table
PRE-SEASON
DateOppositionVenueScore
11 Aug 2023Tonbridge JuddiansHome21- 26
19 August 2023London WelshHome43 - 17
25 Aug 2023BlackheathAway21- 54
NATIONAL LEAGUE 2
DateOppositionVenueScore
2 Sept 2023SevenoaksAway23 - 22
9 Sept 2023Tonbridge JuddiansHome45 - 19
16 Sept 2023EsherAway29 - 21
23 Sept 2023WimbledonHome29 - 32
30 Sept 2023WorthingAway38 - 45
7 October 2023DorkingHome31 - 36
14 October 2023BarnesAway39 - 22
4 November 2023Westcombe ParkHome25 - 19
11 Nov 2023North WalshamAway10 - 54
18 Nov 2023GuernseyAway10 - 34
25 Nov 2023Old AlbanianHome32 - 27
2 Dec 2023Bury St EdmundsAway P - P
9 Dec 2023HenleyHome33 - 43
16 Dec 2023Tonbridge JuddiansAway24 -28
6 January 2024Bury St EdmundsAway33 - 12
13 Jan 2024EsherHome34 - 36
20 Jan 2024WimbledonAway36 - 53
27 Jan 2024WorthingHome36 - 33
10 Feb 2024DorkingAway42 - 22
17 Feb 2024BarnesHome20 - 29
24 Feb 2024Westcombe ParkAway27 - 14
9 March 2024North WalshamHome
16 March 2024GuernseyHome
23 March 2024Old AlbanianAway
6 April 2024Bury St EdmundHome
13 April 2024HenleyAway
27 April 2024SevenoaksHome
WOMEN'S CHAMPIONSHIP SOUTH EAST 2View League Table
PRE-SEASON
DateOppositionVenueScore
Sept 3 2023BlackheathHome41 - 20
Sept 10 2023Thanet WanderersAway
WOMEN'S CHAMPIONSHIP SOUTH EAST 2
DateOppositionVenueScore
Sept 17 2023Farnham WomenHome24 - 0
Sept 24 2023Guildford Gazelles LadiesAway41 - 26
Oct 8 2023Horsham WomenHome15 - 20
Oct 15th (IW CUP)Dartford Valley LadiesAway13 - 5
Oct 22 2023Heathfield & W LadiesHome27 - 5
Oct 29 2023 (WI Plate)Heathfield & W Ladies Home17 - 27
Nov 5 2023Dartford Valley LadiesAway14 - 35
Nov 12 2023Pulborough WomenHome28- 5
Nov 18 2023Guernsey LadiesAway3 - 34
Dec 3 2023Tonbridge Juddian LadiesAway5 - 10
Dec 17 2023Aylesford Bulls LadiesAway
Jan 7 2024Guildford Gazelles LadiesHome
Jan 14 2024Horsham WomenAway27 - 25
Jan 28 2024Heathfield & W Ladies Away5 -5
Feb 11 2024Dartford Valley RosesHome38 - 8
Feb 18 2024Pulborough WomenAway12 - 33
March 10 2024Tonbridge Juddian LadiesHome
march 17 2024Guernsey LadiesAway
April 7 2024Aylesford Bulls LadiesHome
April 14 2024Farnham WomenAway
COUNTIES 1 KENTView League Table
PRE-SEASON
DateOppositionVenueScore
19 Aug 2023London Welsh DruidsHome29- 17
2 Sept 2023SevenoaksAway5 - 17
COUNTIES 1 KENT
DateOppositionVenueScore
16 Sept 2023BeccehamianHome30 - 23
23 septThanet WanderersAway25 - 28
30 Sept 2023Cranbrook 1st XVHome0 - 76
7 Oct 2023Heathfield & WaldronAway18 - 34
14 Oct 2023DartfordiansHome52 - 7
21 Oct 2023Deal & Betteshanger Away21 - 32
4 Nov 2023DoverHome43 - 14
11 Nov 2023Charlton ParkAway16 - 50
18 Nov 2023CrowboroughHome43 - 10
2 Dec 2023AshfordAway0 - 19
9 Dec 2023BromleyHome36 - 10
15 Dec 2023Thanet WanderersHome60 - 22
6 Jan 2024CranbrookAway19 - 43
13 Jan 2024Heathfield & WaldronHome45 - 22
20 Jan 2024DartfordiansAway
27 Jan 2024Deal & BetteshangerHome38 - 17
3 Feb 2024DoverAway31 - 43
10 Feb 2024DartfordiansAway36 - 51
17 Feb 2024Charlton ParkHome60 - 12
2 March 2024CrowboroughAway
16 March 2024AshfordHome
23 March 2024BromleyAway
6 April 2024BeccehamianAway
COUNTIES 5 KENTView League Table
DateOppositionVenueScore
16 Sept 2023Beccehamian IIHome60 - 19
23 Sept 2023GreenwichHomeHWO
30 Sep 2023Cranbrook IIAway12 - 49
21 Oct 2023AskeansHome53 - 26
4 Nov 2023Old Colfeians IIAway55 - 12
18 Nov 2023Sevenoaks IIIAwayP - P
2 Dec 2023Ashford IIHome26 - 15
9 Dec 2023Bromley IIAway26 - 41
16 Dec 2023Sevenoaks IIIAway12 - 5
13 Jan 2024GreenwichHome41 - 19
20 Jan 2024Cranbrook IIHome
27 Jan 2024AskeansAway12 - 70
3 Feb 2024Old Colfeians IIHome57 - 7
2 March 2024Sevenoaks IIIHome
16 March 2024Ashford IIAway
23 March 2024Bromley IIHome
6 April 2024Beccehamian IIHome
KENT B RURALView League Table
DateOppositionVenueScore
16 Sept 2023Medway 4thsHome31 - 22
30 Sept 2023Ash 1AwayWO
7 Oct 2023Dover 2Home0 - 36
14 Oct 2023Folkestone 2Away42 - 12
21 Oct 2023East Peckham 1Home0 - 37
4 Nov 2023Snowdown 1AwayMatch rescheduled - 24 Feb
11 Nov 2023Gillingham Anchorians 2AwayMatch Cancelled
18 Nov 2023Aylesford 2Home27 - 5
2 Dec 2023Thanet 2Home36 - 10
9 Dec 2023Rye 1AwayHWO
6 Jan 2024Ash 1Home24 - 30
13 Jan 2024Dover 2Away45 - 5
20 Jan 2024Folkestone 2HomeMatch Cancelled
27 Jan 2024East Peckham 1AwayHWO
3 Feb 2024Snowdown 1Home7 - 41
10 Feb 2024Folkestone 2Away41 - 5
23 Feb 2024Snowdown 1Home13 - 31
2 March 2024Aylesford 2Away
16 March 2024Thanet 2Away
23 march 2024Rye 1Home
6 April 2024Medway 4Away
KENT A RURALView League Table
DateOppositionVenueScore
16 Sept 2023Sittingbourne 2Home52 - 5
23 Sept 2023Tunbridge Wells 3Away39 - 40
30 Sept 2023Deal 2Away24 - 46
7 Oct 2023Ashford BarbariansHome37 - 17
14 Oct 2023Weavering 1Home32 - 24
21 Oct 2023Edenbridge 1HomeAWO
4 Nov 2023Maidstone 2AwayMatch Cancelled
11 Nov 2023Sittingbourne 2Away40 - 47
18 Nov 2023Leigh 1Home21 - 5
25 Nov 2023London MediaHome54 - 17
2 Dec 2023Thanet 3Home47 - 7
9 Dec 2023Vigo 2Away40 - 0
16 Dec 2024Tunbridge Wells 3Home5 - 45
6 Jan 2024Deal 2Home12 - 48
13 Jan 2024Ashford BarbariansAwayHWO
27 Jan 2024Edenbridge 1Away40 - 0
3 Feb 2024Maidstone 2Home5 - 5
16 Feb 2024Weavering 1Home35 - 36
23 Feb 2024Maidstone 2Away
2 March 2024Leigh 1Away
16 march 2024Thanet 3Away
23 March 2024Vigo 2Home
DateTeamOppositionVenueScore
17 Sept 20231st XVThanet 1'sAway5 - 32
17 Sept 20232nd XVAshfordAway14 - 15
24 Sept 20231st XVMedway (Nat Cup)Away24 - 12
24 Sept 20232nd XVAshfordHome22 - 17
1 Oct 20232nd XVDatfordiansAway17 - 21
8 Oct 20231st XVSidcup 1Home36 - 45
8 Oct 20232nd XVSidcup 2'sHomeMatch Cancelled
15 Oct 20232nd XVWhitstableAway10 - 28
22 Oct 20231st XVAylesford1Home27 - 19
22 Oct 20232nd XVAylesford2HomeMatch Cancelled
30 Oct 20231st XVBury St. Edmunds 1'sAway35 - 26
5 Nov 20231st XVGravesendAwayMatch Cancelled
5 Nov 20232nd XVDeal and BettsAway
12 Nov 20231st XVTonbridge Juddians AAway35 - 19
12 Nov 20232nd XVTonbridge Juddians BAway5 - 17
19 Nov 20231st XVTBC (Nat cup)TBC
26 Nov 20231st XVTBC (County League Rnd 2)TBC
26 Nov 20232nd XVTBc (County League Rnd 2)TBC
10 Dec 20231st XvMedwayHome
10 Dec 20232nd XVMedway GoldHome
17 Dec 20231st XVBishops StortfordHome
17 Dec 20232nd XVBishops StortfordHome
14 Jan 20241st XVSutton & EpsomAway5 - 41
14 Jan 20242nd XVSutton & EpsomAway24 - 58
21 Jan 20241st XVOld ElthamiansAway
21 Jan 20242nd XVOld AlleyniansAway
28 Jan 20231st XVSevenoaksHome
28 Jan 20232nd XVSevenoaksHome
4 Feb 20242nd XVDartfordiansHome
11 Feb 20241st XVTonbridge Juddians AHome
11 Feb 20242nd XVTonbridge Juddians BHome
18 Feb 20241st XVThanet 1's Home
18 Feb 20242nd XVThanet 2's Home
25 Feb 20241st XVGravesend DevHome
25 Feb 20242nd XVGravesend DevHome
3 March 20241st XVSidcupAway
3 March 20242nd XVSidcupAway
10 March 20241st XVAylesfordHome
10 March 2022nd XVAylesfordHome
24 march 20241st XVCounty League Rnd 8TBC
24 March 20242nd XVCounty League Rnd 8TBC
31 March 20241st XVTOUR REDRUTHAway
31 March 20242nd XVTOUR REDRUTHAway
9 April 20272nd XVWhitstable (H) Home
21 April 20241st XVCounty 7'sTBC
21 April 20242nd XVCounty 7'sTBC

Your Club

Club History

CRFC History

After the desolation of the First World War, the 1920s saw a resurgence of sporting and social activity. Rugby was one of the sports that benefitted from this burst of energy and Canterbury was one of the hundreds of clubs that emerged nationwide.

Steve Uglow explores the origins of the city club, the backgrounds of its founding members, its struggle to find a ground but also how it interacted with the social and economic milieu of Canterbury. With Kent on the front line during the Second World War and with Canterbury suffering severe bomb damage, the club only just survives but their matches provide some relief for soldiers and civilians alike.

Our club history is now available for purchase in hardback from Troubador Publishing.

or available as an eBook for download om Amazon.

CRFC History

Summer 1929

Founder members such as Ernie Knew, Clifford Allen, Henry Westron and Dudley Hallwood meet at the Fleur de Lys in Canterbury High Street to discuss the formation of a rugby club. They write letters to the press with an excellent response. This leads to well attended meetings, practice matches and the creation of the club.

1929

October 12th 1929

The first match is held at Jackey Baker’s Sports Ground in Ramsgate. The Canterbury captain is Dudley Hallwood, a speedy threequarter. They lose to a well established Thanet team. Hallwood moves jobs mid-season and is replaced by Clifford Allen.

1929

1930s

The club regularly field two Saturday sides as well as a mid-week, Thursday, team The home matches are played on a ground in the New Dover Road ground – this is now the Barton Estate. Success on the field does not come easily and there are just two winning seasons under captains Francis Gilder and Will Simpson. Scrum half, Ernie Knew, becomes the first Canterbury player to represent Kent.

The HQ is the Royal Fountain Hotel in St Margaret’s Street, where there are changing rooms, baths and hospitality.

In July 1937, the club gets its own ground when president Stephen Williamson, owner of the St Mildred’s Tannery, buys the Merton Lane ground and rents the eleven acres to the club. This major step is celebrated in October 1937, when there is a match between C G Williamson’s Blackheath XV and Canterbury. The club has a pitch but there are no facilities there except a small hut.

1930s

World War II

Many Kent clubs go into abeyance during the war but chairman Henry Westron and captain Will Simpson are determined that the club should keep playing. Farmers Jack Hirst and Strib Helbling keep the club operating, helped out by local military personnel and with matches, often against military units. Part of the ground is let out to other sports such as cricket or to grazing and growing crops.

WW2

1940s

In 1946, the founder-president, Stephen Williamson, resigns and Gabriel Hews, owner-editor of the Kentish Gazette becomes president.

In July 1947, brothers Philip and Thomas Wacher buy the Merton Lane ground. In December they buy more land to the south where the club now has its second pitch. The Wachers lease the land to the club on favourable terms.

On October 15th1947, Kent play Eastern Counties at Canterbury, the first county rugby in East Kent.

1940s

1950s

In May 1953, the club begins to build its first pavilion, overseen by Martin Osborne, who becomes honorary secretary for over twenty years. On December 10th 1954, the new pavilion is opened by Gabriel Hews.

On the field, the club develops into one of the strongest clubs in East Kent with winning seasons under skippers, Hugh Kelsey, followed by Kent cricketer, Geoff Smith, Australian Adrian Kent and David Parker. Parker would be regularly selected as a centre for Kent over several seasons.

1950s

1960s

The playing success continued under captains such as Eddie Hardy, Ken Phillips and Mike Roberts. It was an era in which the Sevens team blossomed, with frequent wins at Dover as well.  The creation of a further pitch meant that the club were able to run its own tournament. The additional pitch was essential as the club were able to field five sides by the end of the decade

Tony Redsell became chairman in 1967, forming an invaluable partnership with secretary David Hallwood that would see major changes in the club.

1960s

1970s

The early 1970s were some disappointing results on the field but the club bounced back. Several talented players arrived, notably Mike Nurton, Grame Lockhart, Gordon Seggar, Mike Tarbit and Kiwi, Peter Clotworthy. This group, coached by Terry Grayson and under the captaincy of Barry Jackson, lifted the Kent Cup in 1975, undoubtedly the highlight of the club’s first fifty years.

Off the field, there was a major extension to the pavilion in 1972, which was celebrated with a match against a side led by England skipper, Budge Rogers XV.

Alongside this, there was the installation of floodlights for training

Towards the end of the 1970s, there was upheaval caused by the Canterbury bypass which required turning the top pitch, moving power lines, water meters, fences, the installation of a safety screen with trees between the new pitch and the road and the building of a new concrete access road.

1979 was  50th jubilee season, which included a dinner at the Westgate Hall and a jubilee match that reunited the Kent Cup winning side, playing the current 1st XV.

1970s

1980s

This period marked a sea change in the game for every club when RFU official leagues were introduced in 1987. Earlier in the decade the club took a bold step by launching Kent’s first floodlit competition which quickly proved a major success with East Kent teams but adapting to the league system proved difficult. Canterbury were placed in the London South East Division and relegated in the first season, starting a decline which continued for four seasons.

1980s

1990s

At the start of the 1990s the team was playing at its lowest point in Kent Division 2  but from that unpromising position a revival was born. Throughout the next ten years the first team climbed steadily up the league ladder and made it their ambition to be a London Division One club by the millennium. They would have achieved that goal had it not been for the administrators.

Having won the London 2 South championship in 1999/2000 they were told there was no promotion because of re-organization of the leagues. The upsurge in fortunes had been achieved through better recruitment policies, properly organised coaching and increased sponsorship. In addition there was an expansion of the strong and successful Junior and Min Rugby sections which were to produce many fine players.  One of them was Andy Pratt who went on to make a record 26 appearances for the Kent County Championship side.

In this period, too, Leon White became the first of four Canterbury players to captain Kent. Leon was subsequently followed by Andy Pratt, Matt Pinnick and Jamie Forsyth. The club also broadened its commitment to the community game by the introduction of a Womens team.

1990s

New Millennium

In 2002 came consolation for the disappointment of two years earlier as promotion was won to London Division One.  This heralded one of the finest decades in Canterbury’s history. In 2006 they were promoted to the National Divisions and won the Kent Cup in four consecutive seasons, 2005 to 2008, beating Blackheath three times and Westcombe Park once.

There was a tentative start to the first venture into National League rugby but the team exceeded all expectations by ending 2006/07 in fourth position in National 3 South. The demands of the higher league, which subsequently became National 2 South, increased every season but Canterbury responded to the challenge and were consistently in the top half of the table. In what was now a semi-professional era this was an exceptional effort when competing against many clubs with heavy financial backing.

2000s

2010/2020

Having established themselves in the National structure the club suffered a temporary set back when they were relegated from National 2 South to National 3 in 2010/11.  The following season they bounced  back to Level 4 and made it an ambition to win a place in National Division One. This was achieved in the 2018/19 season when they defeated Chester in a play-off game in front of the largest crowd ever seen at Canterbury.

The step up proved difficult and relegation from Division One in 2020 coincided with the outbreak of the Covid 19 pandemic which was to bring rugby to a complete halt.  It was an unexpected end to a period in which the club had further broadened its reach by the introduction of a Wheechair rugby team, produced international players in the Touch Rugby game and made huge strides in strengthening its community engagement.

2010/2020